Mexican Aggression And Its American Collaborators

FrontPageMagazine.com | February 28, 2001

By Robert Locke and Mark Andrew Dwyer

Since the U.S.-Mexican Treaty of Peace, Friendship, Limits and Settlement, commonly known as the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo, was signed on February 2nd, 1848, relations between the two countries have not been symmetrical.

For 150 years, the U.S. has offered Mexico peace and friendship, from forcing out the French army that occupied it in 1867, to passing NAFTA in 1994, to bailing out its economy in 1995. On the other hand, Mexico's attitude has been hostile. General Pancho Villa conducted raids on U.S. territory in 1916 and Mexico welcomed Germany's notorious Zimmerman telegram of 1917, in which Germany offered to help her recover her lost territories in exchange for help against the U.S. There have been recurring attacks by the Mexican armed forces on U.S. Border Patrol agents in recent years. Mexico conducted a socialistic expropriation of American

"Open The Border" Fox

Vicente Fox
oil companies in 1917 and refused to vote against OPEC's oil price hikes in 1973. Over the last two decades, we have gotten in lieu of gratitude from our Southern neighbor a huge supply of narcotics, a flood of illegal immigrants, and, most recently, threats of lawsuits and retaliation for enforcing our own immigration laws.

Now, Mexican leaders say they are no longer satisfied with the status quo and are not going to take it anymore. Armed with a population that doubles every 24 years and strengthened by the overwhelming popularity of their newly-elected president, they are launching a demographic war against the U.S. A multi-million man army of colonists, euphemistically referred to as "undocumented migrants," is pouring into the U.S. with help and support from Mexicans who have entrenched themselves here already, from Latino fifth-column organizations, and from commercial interests hungry for cheap labor, many of them multinationals who openly boast of their lack of national loyalty.

Some battles are just about to begin, as Mexican nationalists struggle to infuse their men into American government and strengthen control over their strongholds. For example, the Los Angeles mayoral race is beginning to look like a key battlefield in a well-orchestrated ethnic assault that Latinos are about to launch. Naturally, Mexicans, whose nationalism, unlike ours, is unashamed

Castaneda and Powell

Castaneda (l) and Powell
and on the increase, would never allow Americans to infiltrate and take control of their political system this way.

Mexican leaders are getting more self-confident and assertive. The Mexican Embassy's NAFTA office recently issued a statement that they "expect the U.S. to comply" with NAFTA's recent decision to allow free access of Mexican trucks to American roads in spite of the serious hazard of poorly maintained trucks that don't meet U.S. safety standards.

Mexican Foreign Minister Jorge Castaneda has presented a list of demands regarding 18 million Mexicans living in the U.S., about one third of them illegal, including the demand that America " respect their human rights," i.e. not enforce its own laws. They claim that the measures undertaken to deter illegal border crossings endanger the lives of the perpetrators, whom they describe as "threatened by the U.S. Border Patrol," and have called on the U.N. to deploy troops.

This is all surprising, coming from a country that has units of its regular army, not the police, tightly controlling its own southern border with Guatemala. But it is not surprising given Castaneda's long history as a pro-Castro, America-hating Marxist. He is the quintessential example of how the old anti-American Left has seized on capitalist globalism as the best hope for destroying this country.

Foreign Minister Castaneda has recently said, "We are not scared of engaging the U.S. anymore". In light of our supine political correctness towards his country, this is not irrational on his part. He has vowed to defend Mexicans "without legal papers" and demanded that America give them the "education and health benefits they deserve." So we are being asked to provide socialized medicine to foreigners that we don't even have for our own people. He has ordered Mexican consulates to provide a free legal defense to Mexicans prosecuted in the U.S. or subjected to deportation proceedings.

President Fox has demanded that Mexico be treated as the U.S.'s "peer," despite the fact that one nation is a superpower and the other what was once politely referred to as a banana republic. He has vowed to forge a "more equal relationship" with the U.S. on the subjects of illegal immigration and drug smuggling, as if Americans were flooding Mexico with drugs and illegal aliens. His political refrain of opening the U.S.-Mexican border is a gamble whose temerity shows that he clearly understands the decadence of the U.S. political elite, which can read the Wall St. Journal's call for a constitutional amendment stating that "there shall be open borders" with a straight face. Our failure to defend our own borders has enabled him to threaten that the "immigrants" will keep coming illegally if the U.S. does not comply with his demands. If we would only defend those borders, this blackmail would mean nothing.

"Anti-Americanism is taking root in the barrios. In February 1998 the U.S. soccer team played Mexico in Los Angeles' Coliseum. The crowd booed our national anthem. Fans who applauded the U.S. team were pelted with fruit and cups of beer; the U.S. players were showered with debris and spat upon as they left the field - in their own country."

--Pat Buchanan

Despite claiming a desire to assimilate when in front of gullible mainstream American audiences, many Latinos already in the U.S. have basically ceased being loyal to this country. Although some Mexican Americans have always been loyal to this country, (see the movie Lone Star for an example) they are increasingly outnumbered by their disloyal cousins. This isn't just a matter of throwing rocks at the US soccer team when it played Mexico in Los Angeles a few years ago. They loudly demand an amnesty and voting rights for illegal aliens, protest against deportations of criminals who are illegally in the U.S, and threaten to sue local authorities if police are allowed to enforce the U.S.immigration laws or to refuse driver's licenses to illegals. And the mainstream media act as if all these things don't happen or else openly side with the defenders of illegality and anti-Americanism.

Mexico's pursuit of her national interest at our expense is understandable.What is incomprehensible is the open collaboration of some Americans, masked by a thick coating of political correctness. The Texas legislature recently conducted an entire session in Spanish. Several U.S. Senators (Phil Gramm is one) and Congressmen (Luis Gutierrez is one) do the best they can to pass an amnesty-type legislation that would keep the army of Mexican "migrants" pouring into the U.S, serving permanent notice that no matter what laws we pass, we will eventually reward those who succeed in breaking them. When Secretary of State Colin Powell said to Castaneda, "Our common border is no longer a line that divide us," this may well turn out to have been a literal prediction of the future, not a piece of warm-and-fuzzy rhetoric. Bush's outreach to Hispanic voters has been so awesomely unsuccessful in terms of actually getting them to vote for him that one cannot but wonder if he has other motives for this fruitless policy.

The tragedy of it all is that, given our fundamentally absolute superiority of power over Mexico, we could end all this nonsense simply by standing firm on fundamental and obvious issues like our right to enforce our own laws and keep our own culture. We wouldn't even have to do anything nasty to make the point. But if our own decadent willingness to hand over our country to an aggressive foreign power remains painfully obvious, the Mexicans will be fools not to continue to exploit it. We educated half their elite at Harvard and the University of Chicago, so of course they are bright enough to figure out what's going on. The biggest puzzle is how we expect them to respect a nation that clearly doesn't respect itself. It's time we did, for our sake and, in the long run, their own.

Robert Locke resides in New York City and Mark Andrew Dwyer in California. E-mail Locke at lockerobert@hotmail.com.

(Links/photos/emphasis added by VCT - Posted on the VCT site with the permission of Mark Andrew Dwyer)


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